Crowd Singing

Ever since Edward Sharpe’s “Home,” and with the rise of Mumford & Sons, crowd singing has become increasingly prevalent. Hearing the crowd singing along with the Lumineers at the Grammys got me thinking that everything is more interactive these days. Even music. Our culture is focused on social media and sharing, and crowd singing seems to be the latest manifestation of this trend.

share Gregtweet Greg

5 Comments

Recent Comments

  1. Greg

    Def. In concert for sure. But not as much on recorded pieces, except for some of the old folk songs from the early to mid part of last century. My point here is that “crowd sing” is now its own real form of music, where the band is inviting participation in a way that is indicative of some modern trends.

  2. lcf

    I think it also has to do with the type of music being produced. These nuvo folky bands are making music that is obviously very inspired by those old folk songs to which you refer. It will be interesting to see if this crowd sing thing takes off across more genres of music. Meanwhile, I will continue to crowd sing into my hairbrush in front of the mirror every morning.

  3. L

    I honestly don’t see the connection. If our culture is so focused at this particular moment in time on the interactivity of things and this is the driving factor into what artistic works prevail and what trends catch on we would be hearing a lot more about attempts like Arcade Fire’s interactive music video for Sprawl II http://www.sprawl2.com, in which the viewer controls the movement in the video using just her/his web cam, or OK Go’s video for All Is Not Lost http://www.allisnotlo.st/index_en.html that was made in collaboration with Pilobolus and encourages users after the video ends to send messages comprised of letters created by the dancers bodies via social media, or Beck’s most recent project that provides internet users a full 360º viewing experience of his live performance of Bowie’s Sound And Vision http://www.hello-again.com/beck360/main/beck360.html.

    What I see is a few bands with a number of singers, catchy banjo riffs and repetitive lyrics caught someone’s eye or ear and happened to make it into the main stream. The crowd sing is just a result of the historical folk musical stylings that these bands are reflective of. Not a direct correlation with our society’s addiction to social media.

  4. Andrew D.

    Crowd sing is one of the original forms of ‘interactive media’. One could argue that knowing a common song even makes it one of the nascent forms of ‘social media’.

What do you think?